Android News

Google bans about 1% of Android Market apps

August 25, 2009 | by Andrew Kameka

Android News

Google bans about 1% of Android Market apps

While most of the tech world has been beating up on Apple for its app store approval process, Google has provided clarification on its own app screening process. Android Apps are not held at the mercy of some arbitrary approval process, nor are they pre-emptively crippled without features that greatly diminish an app’s worth. Instead, Google leaves it up to Android users to discover and report bannable apps, a process that has led to only 1% of apps being banned from the Android Market.

In response to an FCC inquiry about app store approval processes, Google stated that there is no pre-approval process, only an automatic screening that seeks to identify technical issues. Android Market visitors flag apps, which Google then investigates. About one percent of all apps that have been uploaded to the Android Market – roughly 60 out of 6,000 – have been removed. Aside from the T-Mobile assault on tethering, the bannings have mostly centered on inappropriate and adult content that violated the Market’s Terms of Services.

Let’s be clear that Google have quite a bit of work to do on the Android Market; however, they should be commended for a relatively sensible approval process less likely to deny users access to worthwhile apps/features.

[MocoNews]